The Rise And Fall Of Stagecoaches In Iowa

In the 1850s little boys wanted to be stagecoach drivers when they grew up. Perched high on the seat, in control of a team of high-spirited horses, racing through the countryside—a stagecoach driver’s job looked pretty glamorous to the typical 10 year old.

“Aunt Becky” Young Disregards Authority for Her Boys

“I never had a rude word from a soldier in my life. I’ve met rebuffs from steamboat captains and paymasters and that kind of fish, but never from one of the boys!” Aunt Becky Young told a reporter with the Chicago Tribune in 1888.

Former Iowa Governor Grabs Headlines With His Horse In Washington

When former Iowa governor Leslie Shaw was chosen by President Theodore Roosevelt as his secretary of the treasury in 1902, Iowans were prepared to see his name in the national headlines. He grabbed headlines, but not always because of his actions as the treasury department head.

Iowans Lost At Sea In 1875 Disaster

Survivors described the cries and shrieks of dying passengers as “heart-rending.” And one recalled the last voice he heard was that of a “little child in a cabin.”

No Hitching Posts, No Business: Iowa History

Farmers in the Charles City area threatened to take their business to neighboring towns if the Improvement Association removed the hitching posts in the city park. But the 45 women who had formed the new association in 1903 weren’t about to back down. Before long the hitching posts were gone and only a fading memory. The hitching post removal had been a hard-fought victory for the women, but it was only one of many improvements they planned for the town over the next ten years. Number one on the list was to beautify the city’s only public park.

Wartime Rumors Swept Through Iowa’s Camp Dodge in 1917

No, the Red Cross would never solicit donations through chain letters. And the public should immediately destroy any of those bogus letters they received in the mail. Conditions at Camp Dodge near Des Moines, where thousands of boys from across the Midwest were training as soldiers were better than at many other military camps around the country, despite rumors. And that woman from southern Iowa who had helped spread juicy bits of scandal about the camp was headed for an appearance in front of a federal grand jury. The country was at war in 1917, and military leaders were busy tamping down negative press.